arrow-right cart chevron-down chevron-left chevron-right chevron-up close menu minus play plus search share user email pinterest facebook instagram snapchat tumblr twitter vimeo youtube subscribe dogecoin dwolla forbrugsforeningen litecoin amazon_payments american_express bitcoin cirrus discover fancy interac jcb master paypal stripe visa diners_club dankort maestro trash

Shopping Cart


by Gabrielle Caravetta


Blog

Cannabis Reforms in Ohio

by Gabrielle Caravetta


Cannabis Reforms in Ohio

by Gabrielle Caravetta


Credit: Lukas Barfield @ ganjapreneur.com

Cannabis activists in Ohio are anxious to gather enough signatures by the end of November to force the legislature to pass an adult-use cannabis bill or let the issue appear on the 2022 ballot according to the Ohio Capital-Journal.  

Organizers within the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol received permission from the Ohio Ballot Board to move forward with collecting signatures in August. Once 133,000 signatures are gathered and validated by state officials the legislature must act on the proposal within four months. If  legislation fails to pass the bill then the measure to cultivate, process, and distribute adult-use cannabis will appear as a 2022 ballot initiative. 

Attorney Thomas Haren, a representative of the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, spoke at the Ohio State University law school’s Drug Enforcement and Policy Center. He announced that it is very likely that the group will have the required amount of signatures by the end of this month. 

According to the Journal report, this proposal would allow for Ohians to legally possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis and 15 grams of cannabis extract. Adults over 21 would be allowed to purchase cannabis at retail locations and grow 2 plants per person with a cap of 4 per household. 

Earlier this month, a NORML/Gallup poll found support for cannabis legalization at an all-time high of 68%. That poll may have prompted Weinstein to describe Ohio’s cannabis law as “a situation where we’re behind where Ohioans are.”

He said the initiated statute may provide a greater sense of “urgency” for legislature action.